Author Topic: LIST OF MOST INFLUENTIAL AFRICAN GUITARISTS  (Read 10784 times)

shamala on: July 13, 2014, 16:59

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Surprised the list lacks some big names we are always praising ...However the names here are known worldwide..

Barthelemy Attisso - lead guitarist of Orchestre Baobab, of Senegal.

Alick Macheso - lead guitarist of Ochestra Mberikwazvo, of Zimbabwe.

Oliver De Coque - Ogene Sound Super of Africa

Mamadou Diop (also known as Modou Diop) - Senegalese rhythm guitarist, now based in the United States of America

Afel Bocoum - Malian guitarist, Ali Farka Touré's noted protégé

Henri Bowane - A figure in the development of Congo rumba, early mentor to Franco.

Diblo Dibala - a Congolese soukous musician, known as "Machine Gun" for his speed and skill on the guitar.

Nico Kasanda (aka "Dr. Nico") - one of the pioneers of soukous music.

François Luambo Makiadi (aka "Franco") - Congolese musician, founder of the seminal group OK Jazz.

Nico Mbarga - lead guitarist and famous composer of the hit song "Sweet Mother."

Oliver Mtukudzi - Guitarist from Zimbabwe and leader of the 'Black Spirits'

Jean-Bosco Mwenda - Pioneer of African fingerstyle in 1950s, Congo

Ray Phiri- Lead guitarist from Mpumalanga, South Africa best known for his exhilarating lead guitar sessions in Paul Simon's Graceland Album.

Jonah Sithole Zimbabwean guitarist, played with Thomas Mapfumo

Djelimady Tounkara, lead guitarist for the Super Rail Band of Bamako, Mali.

Ali Farka Touré - singer and guitarist from Mali.

Vieux Farka Touré - son of Ali Farka Touré, young rising star from Mali.

Sir Victor Uwaifo- Guitarist from bini/Edo speaking people, based in Benin City Edo State Nigeria.

Dr Sir Warrior - Vocalist and Guitarist of Oriental Brothers International Band

Jonah Sithole - Late mbira guitarist used to play with Thomas Mapfumo

Habib Koité - vocalist and guitarist from Senegal
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Jdog #1 on: July 13, 2014, 17:43

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Why is Flamme Kapaya not on this list??
Or moto asala le monde eza yo Nzambe tata, Kita okata po mokili trop matata, kata- Fally Ipupa

shamala #2 on: July 13, 2014, 17:58

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Why is Flamme Kapaya not on this list??

most influential list not the best.check Jean-Bosco Mwenda - Pioneer of African fingerstyle in 1950s, Congo..is he pioneered the fingering style that congolese and generally african guitarist use. note Oliver Tshimanga is also missing .
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KAISARI #3 on: July 13, 2014, 18:05

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And none of Seben pioneers(Benga) ?
You do not beat a drum with one finger

SLY PAPA NA KEVIN #4 on: July 13, 2014, 21:05

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Am glad Alick Macheso of Zimbabwe is on the list, he's bloody brilliant on bass, he's the only bass guitarist i know who plays a 6 six bass guitar, he really pulls on the strings,it's the bass which leads in his music.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2014, 23:57 by DJ SLY »
LE BIG BOSS

shamala #5 on: July 13, 2014, 21:34

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Am glad Alick Macheso of Zimbabwe is on the list, he's bloody brilliant on bass, he's the only bass guitarist who plays a 6 six bass guitar, he really pulls on the strings,it's the bass which leads in his music.

I think that is why he is on the list..not just good but unique
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SLY PAPA NA KEVIN #6 on: July 13, 2014, 23:25

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Am glad Alick Macheso of Zimbabwe is on the list, he's bloody brilliant on bass, he's the only bass guitarist who plays a 6 six bass guitar, he really pulls on the strings,it's the bass which leads in his music.

I think that is why he is on the list..not just good but unique
That's right, what most of the ones on the list are known for is their pioneering work. The likes of Kapaya have not done anything extraordinary but Olivier Tshimanga i think should be there because he's mixed spanish guitar and congolese finger style and created a unique form of playing congolese rhumba on acoustic guitar.
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chamhembe #7 on: July 13, 2014, 23:34

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Alick macheso is a genius Bassist the man can play th guitar with many parts of his body including. His forehead .

KAISARI #8 on: July 13, 2014, 23:40

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...Sungura is fast paced Benga with a heavy dose of Bass, I attended and enjoyed one of his shows in Jersey but I had my old cam which recorded poorly.
You do not beat a drum with one finger

BG-ground #9 on: July 14, 2014, 00:06

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Not saying Diblo is bad,bt there been only one or 2 sebene he did that impressed me...I'd choose Dally Kimoko, Caen Mandoka or Nene Tchakou instead even Rigo & Baroza Basimba

Kinda disapointing when we dont see Guvano, Pepe Felly, Roxy,Matima and Alain Makaba

shamala #10 on: July 14, 2014, 04:55

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Even Alain Makaba did not make the list!
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Bohemian Rhapsody #11 on: November 28, 2018, 19:30

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Interesting list

Dr. Nico Kasanda is the father of single note playing and most influential. He birthed Sekou Bembeya Diabate of Guinea (West African version of Nico) and mastered every style known to mankind. Dizzy Mandjeku, Doris Ebuya, Gerry Dialunguna of OK Jazz, Kizunga Rickos, Dally Kimoko; Caen Madoka; Rigo Star and many more. I'm surprise him and Franco didn't collab, despite them blowing up at the same time.

I would add Bongo Wende but then, he was inspired by the late Jimi Hendrix (Afro diaspora).

Pepe Manuaku who inspired countless bands in the 1970s, he promoted Octaves which was introduced by Afro-American, Wes Montgomery (). This also influenced Roxy, Beniko, Kinanga Boeing of Empire Bakuba, Nene Tchakou Mandosi (Nene has a style of his own as well), Makaba, Petit Poisson and so on.

Dino Vangu changed the way of Afrisa.

Bavon Marie Marie (Franco's younger brother) -- birthed the fast swift playing utilized in Rumba Soukous in the late 60s. This was later mastered by Nseka Huit Kilos, Michelino Mavatiku Visi, Denis Loubassou, Yacomba Diblo Dibala, etc.


Charles "Dechaud" Mwamba -- mastered mi-compose which nurtured Denis "Lokassa Ya M'Bongo" Kassiya, Pablo Lubadika, Prof. Omari in Les Wanyika, Lele Nsundi of Orch. Kiam, Carrol Makhamba of Choc Stars, Bopol Mansiamina, Vata Mombasa, Benga players in Kenya, etc. Almost every guitarist in Central and East Africa had this tuning.

Mose Fan Fan was the man who made Franco changed to his signature aggressive style in Odemba Rumba; he was in OK Jazz from 1967-1973 but one may not know until they listed to Djelemasi. This style also nurtured Syran M'Benza; Nguza Viking (Maquis Original); Shiko Mawatu; Caen Madoka and Dally also mastered

Flamme Kapaya - no comment. But listen to One Kienga in Shora Mbemba's Super Choc and you'll see the influence in Kapaya.

Felly Tyson and Japonais Maladi -- introduced Ndombolo riffs.

Baroza wasn't the first to bring distortion though. Ya Manuaku came through on Zaiko''s "Adieu Petit Cherie" in 1979 and Diblo in Loketo's Extra Ball in 89. However, there's many variations of distortions some include chorus, some include organ, piano, etc.

George Ramogi & D.O. Misiani influenced Kenyan Benga. They took the syncopated melodies and imitated it in the late 1960s.

Mboka Liya especially in the middle of the fret-board.

Many African guitarists are also influenced by their cousins overseas. That's how they become diverse in their playing. If sebene was taught in workshop like in U.S.; Canada; etc, you'll probably see more younger cats abroad.