Author Topic: The Diaspora copying our music/ The evolution of Afro-Cuban influence?  (Read 586 times)

faithandwar on: March 07, 2018, 00:33

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So i've been trying to learn as much as I can about our music through this forum as of recently, and I'm so thankful for it.

I've constantly heard about how other countries have been directly influenced and put their different spin on our music growing up, especially with West Africans. I'm not trying to start an all out music war against different countries, but it's curiosity. It bothers me a bit to see some of our artists reducing their artistry to follow the diluted trend of Afrobeat, when we're the trendsetters from what I understand. As well as not widely known for it globally. 

But also how has the influence of Afro-Cuban music evolved into where our music was at it's prime? But technically doesn't Afro Cuban music come from Central Africa?

So back to the main question, whats's the history of the rest of the continent rebranding our music?
 Any specific examples, timelines, stories?



BrazzaBoy #1 on: March 07, 2018, 09:22

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Thats a good question I have asked myself often regarding the afro cubans influence. I have wondered how do we know for sure Afro cuban music is from african influences. Not sure if its more the instruments or the rythm that give it an african resemblance. Hopefully one of the more experienced poeople on the forum can make the connection for you young brother.

If you would like to further understand how it evolved into what it is now you would have to take it from the source, take it from the beginning and work your way up. You’d wanna start at the very very beginning with Wendo Kolosoy, Bowane, Joseph Kabasele and work your way up. That should kind of show you how it evolved.


Now with the copying of our music its hard to say because our music is a blend of different sounds from different places in the first place, including west africa. Afrobeat doesnt too much sound like our music but Coupe Decale at the time was a blatant copy. I do however understand your frustration towards our artist leaning more towards afrobeats at times. Times are hard, no concerts in europe, and wanting to target bigger markets are all factors.

Paysan Congolais #2 on: March 07, 2018, 10:13

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West african influence in the birth of our music ? How ?

When I listen to Wendo & Bowane, Paulo Kamba, Lucie Eyenga, Adou Elenga and others I don't hear that west african influence ?

Are you sure about that ?

BrazzaBoy #3 on: March 07, 2018, 16:38

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Yes it was the popos (immigrants from west africa i believe) that brought guitars and other instruments with them im pretty sure. Read that in Rumba on the River written by gary stewart.

Congolitude #4 on: March 07, 2018, 17:05

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That I have already heard is that our music (rumba) does not come from Cuba as we are taught. The Rumba comes from a dance called Kumba, originating from our Bantu ancestors from Central Africa (Kongo empire, Gabon ...) and they imported with them during the slave trade into the tobacco fields. The Cubans will resume our dance by renaming it Rumba.

I put you some articles explaining better than me the origin of our dear rumba: http://www.nzolani.net/spip.php?rubrique1

RUMBA IS THE DANCE OF OUR ANCESTORS AND NOT CUBAN !

faithandwar #5 on: March 07, 2018, 17:12

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West african influence in the birth of our music ? How ?

When I listen to Wendo & Bowane, Paulo Kamba, Lucie Eyenga, Adou Elenga and others I don't hear that west african influence ?

Are you sure about that ?

I don't think you read my question right, I wanted to know how they were influenced by us, not the other way around. I'm not saying that our music was influenced by West Africans.

faithandwar #6 on: March 07, 2018, 17:15

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That I have already heard is that our music (rumba) does not come from Cuba as we are taught. The Rumba comes from a dance called Kumba, originating from our Bantu ancestors from Central Africa (Kongo empire, Gabon ...) and they imported with them during the slave trade into the tobacco fields. The Cubans will resume our dance by renaming it Rumba.

I put you some articles explaining better than me the origin of our dear rumba: http://www.nzolani.net/spip.php?rubrique1

RUMBA IS THE DANCE OF OUR ANCESTORS AND NOT CUBAN !

Thanks for the link!

I've always heard that Rumba made its way back to us from our Ancestors so I'll definitely get reading.

faithandwar #7 on: March 07, 2018, 18:41

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Thats a good question I have asked myself often regarding the afro cubans influence. I have wondered how do we know for sure Afro cuban music is from african influences. Not sure if its more the instruments or the rythm that give it an african resemblance. Hopefully one of the more experienced poeople on the forum can make the connection for you young brother.

If you would like to further understand how it evolved into what it is now you would have to take it from the source, take it from the beginning and work your way up. You’d wanna start at the very very beginning with Wendo Kolosoy, Bowane, Joseph Kabasele and work your way up. That should kind of show you how it evolved.


Now with the copying of our music its hard to say because our music is a blend of different sounds from different places in the first place, including west africa. Afrobeat doesnt too much sound like our music but Coupe Decale at the time was a blatant copy. I do however understand your frustration towards our artist leaning more towards afrobeats at times. Times are hard, no concerts in europe, and wanting to target bigger markets are all factors.

Yeah definitely, I've heard Marie Lousie by Wendo but that's about it. But thanks for the other artist's you've reccomended, I think I know Kabasele because of Independence Cha Cha and his influence on Franco& Tabuley.

 I was definitely trying to get to on how different off shoots of genres like Ndombolo, Tcha-Tcho and Sebene came from that Afro-Cuban influence. There's not a lot articles in English about our music from the late 80's to the early 2000's and it's evolution. 

As far as West Africans being influenced by our music, it's just something iv'e heard from family around me, I just wanted to know how. Was it something in structure/arrangement, instruments, etc? How did they copy us and get away with it?

Also, I know it's a male dominated forum but I'm a girl lol.   

BrazzaBoy #8 on: March 07, 2018, 19:45

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I think its a misconception. We tend to think that every music that is out today that comes from west africa is derived from our music. I dont think thats true as I mentioned Im not sure how much afrobeat is related to us if at all. As far as Coupe-Decale, thats the only genre from west africa that I know for sure got inspired from us. Coupe decale from ivory coast was pretty much sped up ndombolo in french. They would have atalakus that would pretend to speak lingala a lot of times, and the rythmn was ndombolo. But coupe decale and the music thats popular now are totally different. Now on the other end, Afro Trap which just came out of France about a year ago is heavily influenced in Ndombolo. A lot of guitar arrangements. Afrobeat however is probably not from us, because Fela Kuti has been out since the 60s and I believe he’s the originator of that sound, and they didnt even use guitars in a lot of his most famous work so that tells you how much we’re related.