Author Topic: When Kanda Bongo Man & Diblo Dibala ruled the 80s  (Read 295 times)

Bohemian Rhapsody on: December 29, 2018, 21:36

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During the 80's, it was difficult for solo artists to branch out due to the big band era (Clan Zaiko, Afrisa, OK Jazz, etc).

However, due to Soukous and Zouk Chirè blowing up, a young Kanda along with virtuoso Diblo (real name -- Yacomba) pops up. There's an interesting story behind Kanda's first LP "Iyole" (1981). Diblo states, it wasn't supposed to be uptempo from the start but start as a rumba. The person who came up with the idea to make it fast was producer, Ouattara Mamouni, owner of Afro Rythmes label (big in the 80s and 90s). Diblo said that Mr. Mamouni cut the slow part because others of the Afro diaspora couldn't understand Lingala and the dancing part (sebene) was really thrills people. The rest is history. However, one should know that neither Kanda nor Aurlus are the first to produce Soukous. Another interesting fact is Fally Ipupa is related to Kanda and sound somewhat, similar.











mvulusi96 #1 on: December 29, 2018, 22:39

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There are people who say that Sam Mangwana started Soukous in Abidjan when he created African All Stars. Making those short songs in French, since that they were a ban on Lingala-songs in French-West Africa (Mali, Togo, Ivory Coast, Senegal, etc.), just to fight Congolese music.

Then you have people saying that it was Bantous de la Capitale in Brazzaville (former OK-Jazz musicians who returned to Brazzaville in 1959) who created the term Soukous and also its genre. 

I remember Tabu Ley claiming many times in interviews, when he used to live in exil in France (1990-1994), saying that he was the creator of Soukous. Saying that he created that fast tempo mixing Congolese music with Rock'n Roll with songs like Assambalela, when he was preparing his show at Olympia (1970). Also adding that he's in reality the father of the style the 3th generation plays (Zaiko, Thu Zahina, Isifi, Viva, Victoria, etc.), because he came with that swinging-style. Btw it was because of changing his music-style from slow-rumba to fast music, that he lost his nickname "Le Poete" to Simaro Lutumba Ndomanueno and Gina Efonge. Many people forgot that people used to name Tabu Ley in the 60's, "Le Poete" Rochereau.

mvulusi96 #2 on: December 29, 2018, 22:42

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So sad that West-African people aren't really involved (expect people coming from Ivory Coast) in Congolese music like in the past. It used to be their playground with if artists weren't succeeding in Kinshasa, then deciding to settle in Abidjan or Lome (sometimes also Dakar) and re-start their career there and becoming famous in that part of Africa.