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Messages - MwanaMokili

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1
Thereafter we started seeing the same format from the likes of Arlus Mabele and Loketo, Kassav and other session musicians developing what was called internationally 'Soukouss'  ....

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You mean to tell me Zaiko are the ones to blame for Kanda Bongo Man and his peers?? ;D



 ;D ;D ;D

Not really, but it is after the success of Nippon Bonzai that the international stations started paying attention to Lingala, and the short mostly instrumental song ( With little or no message) but danceable tunes started getting airplay.

For a beginner of Zaiko, the journey can very long and the number of albume defintely more than 5.

My journey of Zaiko started with the 1976 Ghana Festival ( Zaiko Wa Wa Wa signature tune).

Another landmark point of the Group was the split that gave us Nkolo Mboka and Familia Dei...
Depending on the followers, there are those who prefer Nkolo Mboka and those who prefer Familia Dei, although I do not hear of Familia dei much nowadays.

Any news of Familia Dei branch of Zaiko will be welcome, but Nyoka Longo seems to be the last man standing of the Zaiko Clan.



2

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Nippon Banzai, though one of my faves as a kid, is my least favorite album.  The album was never live, there were no original songs and the fake applause tracks were annoying.  I get the concept, promote the playlist, shorten the songs for the Japanese audience and that formula along with the Japanese tour helped to spring up "soukous" bands in Japan, but again my least favorite.
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That album though was perfect for Western audiences, particularly those who just learned about the band or even African music in general. I agree it takes out the soul of Zaiko, if that was what you were alluding to... it’s like a movie with non-stop action scenes rather than a slow intriguing buildup

The dilema most Lingala bands have with international audiences are
1. Language barrier where the audience does not really understand what the lyrics of the song are
2. For Radio, the average Lingala song is too long for airplay, so most have to be cut short.

Nippon Bonzai was the innovative solution to these two problems in that the songs were limited to just short renditions of their biggest hits, just to highlight the instrumental parts and short enough to fit the three/four minute airplay limit, they sounded complete.

From this developed a concept of short lingala songs contrary to the mainstream greats like  Franco and Tabu Ley whose songs would be as long as fifteen minutes. This led to international radio exposure and audiences acceptance.

Thereafter we started seeing the same format from the likes of Arlus Mabele and Loketo, Kassav and other session musicians developing what was called internationally 'Soukouss'  ....


3
Congolese Music / Re: WORLD CUP 2018 THREAD
« on: July 07, 2018, 07:12 »
France and Belgium - one has to go as they meet in the Semis.

England has an easier route to the final, if they do not win this World Cup, then they never will.

Mathematically France may make it to the Final against England but I would not put my money on it seeing all the shocks this world Cup has given.

I will Just Enjoy the remaining African Team (France) wild run and watch the games....

4
That combo of Bill, Thierry Synthe, Ali Mbonda, Kakol, Mimiche & Capitaine Flamme was too lethal

This was Maison Merre with Hunger and Fire!

Operation Dragon was one CD where Werrason wanted to show the world WMM in its true colours.

I think the competition has kind of died down and MM is coasting.

5
Très fort

Not 100% traditional sebene like we're used to, but nevertheless nice

Not quite there but the Bass has a mean streak to it...

6
That’s a fire remix. Most interesting Brazza  song I’ve heard in some time.

Quentin is looking like a west African griot with that beard  :D. Gray beards are in vogue now

I agree, it is very good.

The Signature guitar licks, the Drums classic Extra stuff

Those Cries of 'Tokoningisa Mboka mobimba ' gives me the feel of a throwback to them days when Extra
 was competing seriously with Mbuta Likasu...

7
Congolese Music / Re: CHURCH I WOULD GO ANYTIME
« on: May 20, 2018, 17:23 »
 ;D ;D ;D

Who is the Atalaku?

Just add Mabanga and you have a hit on your hands...

Kanisa gani hii??

8
Congolese Music / Re: WHICH VERSION WAS THE BEST?
« on: May 14, 2018, 08:34 »


1st version in Wenge Musica in the album Bouger Bouger with the notable duo with JB

Version Original for me still Rules.

This is one of the Nolstagic tunes of the Original Wenge 4X4

Melodies and Arrangement  that the two other versions can not reach.


9

Ramazani "Remmy" Mtoro Ongala (1947 10 Feb – 13 December 2010) was a Tanzanian guitarist and singer.
Ongala was born in Kindu near the Tanzanian border, in what was the Belgian Congo at the time, and now is the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Remmy Ongala travelled to Dar es Salaam where he joined Orchestra Makassy in 1978, and later broke off to form
his own band Orchestre Super Matimila (named after the businessman who owned the band's instruments).

Ongala's tune are reminiscent of T.P.O.K Jazz but he sang predominatly in Swahili in a style he called 'Ubongo', the
Swahili word for brain.  He mostly sang about social topics like the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Corruption,  urbanisation and
unity and fidelity between a man and his wife. This led his fans to nick-name him Sauti ya Mynoge (voice of the poor man).

Some of his major Hits are Mariam Wangu :





Sauti Ya Mnyonge ( The Poor Man's Voice) :




Siku Ya Kufa ( The day of one's Death ) :



Karola :



Asili Ya Muziki ( The Origin of Music) :





Remmy Ongala exported his music abroad and for a period was based in Sweden, and he toured prominently in Europe.
Even as he toured, his message was still on topical issues, translating his songs to English for the European audience :





 He is regarded as one of Tanzania's greatest composers/singers.

10

Who is he?

I dont seem to know anything about him...

11

There's a common misconception on what the sebene really is.  in Marie Louise, Wendo Kolosoy yelled out in a "Yoka sebene" and the guitarists plucked out danceable melodies and rhythms, in a rhumba song.  When it comes to the sebene, nakoyoka ba kulutus.  They're the pioneers before Wenge, Zaiko, African Jazz etc.  So when I hear people like you say, people outside of Congo don't care about the sebene, that's not true.  To many Europeans, the sebene can be in a rhumba song.  Franco thrived on the sebene: the danceable instrumental ending of a song.

Somehow through the Evolution of Congolese music, the sebene has been misconstrued to only belong to fast paced songs like generiques.  I blame this on Soukous and Ndombolo.

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There's a common misconception on what the sebene really is.  in Marie Louise, Wendo Kolosoy yelled out in a "Yoka sebene" and the guitarists plucked out danceable melodies and rhythms, in a rhumba song.  When it comes to the sebene, nakoyoka ba kulutus.  They're the pioneers before Wenge, Zaiko, African Jazz etc.  So when I hear people like you say, people outside of Congo don't care about the sebene, that's not true.  To many Europeans, the sebene can be in a rhumba song.  Franco thrived on the sebene: the danceable instrumental ending of a song.

Somehow through the Evolution of Congolese music, the sebene has been misconstrued to only belong to fast paced songs like generiques.  I blame this on Soukous and Ndombolo.

The Sebene used to mean the instrumental break in those hits of yore that you cite.

In those songs, the song would start slow, with the message or the story of the song being told. This would normally be where the vocalists would display their talent, with first voice, second voice and sometimes a chorus to reprise the hook line.

After the story is told, it was time to Dance!

The song would speed up, and it was time for the instrumentalists to display their art. Optionally you would also have  the hook line reprised over and over, but sometimes you would have shout outs either to the instrumentalist who happened to be displaying their skill at that section, or call out a fan, donor e.t.c.

After the instrumental break ( Sebene)  the song would slow down again,  mostly with the chorus or reprise fading to the end.

Nowadays the Sebene has come to mean a song that starts slowly and then speeds up to a climax.
Contrast this with a Rumba which is a song that is sung on an even (mostly slow) tempo throughout.

A Generique is just the instrumental (Fast tempo) part, with cries (Shout outs) focusing mostly on mabangas, attacks or praises,
with little or no message.

I normally compare generiques to the raps and diss tracks in the Western hip Hop genre.

You would be right to attribute the generiques to the Soukuos/Ndombolo Era, where quantity ( Not necessarily quality) matters,
and it doesn't take much to be a generique musician....

12

Grand Piza was a great Hit in the 70's

Mandalala was such a great hit in Nairobi that all discos were not discos if the DJ did not have this...



Other notable Hits were Mwana Mawa




13
Congolese Music / Re: Anyone with this album please?
« on: April 24, 2018, 18:37 »
Please people of God anyone with this album share with...I really love the little man.


This little man is the one that made Koffi so jealous. Koffi is reported to have torn Suzuki's Passport to stop him from travelling with QL on tour.

I remember around the 1996/97 era Koffi came to Perform in Nairobi, the Fans demanded to hear Suzuki and kept chanting his name.
Koffi tried to explain that Suzuki could not come this trip and promised to bring him the next trip, the fans then told him they would attend his show the next trip. Tough times for Koffi.

Stilla is my favourite Suzuki song from the QL album Faux de Faux Pas....

14
over the decades,we've had a loooooot of popular dancers,i randomly say mukonyonyo,pomper kijection,madiaba,kwassa kwassa,mayeno,suabiwutu,ndombolo,kisanola,nkila mogrosso,boma liwanza,mutuka munene.... which one would you love to see some sort of remake again and go viral?

Chaku libodass and Mokom nyon nyon


15
 
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The other issue is that is other cultures have taken a lot from Congolese music but without giving proper credit. A Colombian band literally made a start-to-finish remix of Extra Musica's "Etat major" and it has more views that Extra's original.

I appreciate that they appreciate our music, but still they should indicate somewhere that this is a remix.

Indeed Matebu,

I do not know why Colombians do that,
The most embarassing was the Shakira Rip of the World Cup tune " Its Time for Africa".

It created such a big fuss she the World Cup Organisers had to acknowledge the Cameroonian troupe that originally composed the tune and had to pay some good money to avoid a PR disaster.

They should make an effort to contact the original composers and give credit.


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